Turkic cultures

 (including Tartar, Bashkir, Chuvashes, Uyghur, etc.)

, 


INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT the Turkic peoples
  • The Turkic peoples are a collection of ethnic groups that live in north, east, central and western Asia, northwestern China and parts of Eastern Europe. The term Turkic represents a broad ethno-linguistic group of peoples including existing societies such as the Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Chuvashes, Kazakhs, Tatars, Kyrgyz, Turkmens, Uyghurs, Uzbeks, Bashkirs, Qashqai, Gagauz, Yakuts, Crimean Karaites, Krymchaks, Karakalpaks, Karachays, Balkars, and Nogais.
  • The Turkic languages are a language family of at least 35 languages, spoken by Turkic peoples across Southeastern Europe, the Mediterranean to Siberia and Western China. Turkic languages are spoken as a native language by 170 million people. The Turkic language with the greatest number of speakers is Turkish proper, spoken mainly in Anatolia and the Balkans. Characteristic features of Turkish, such as vowel harmonyagglutination, and lack of grammatical gender, are universal within the Turkic family. There is also a high degree of mutual intelligibility among the various Oghuz languages, which include TurkishAzerbaijaniTurkmenQashqaiGagauzBalkan Gagauz Turkish and Oghuz-influenced Crimean Tatar

  • Etymology. There are many uses of the word "turk" in ancient Persian literature, however the exact origin of the word is unknown. One theory is that it means "strength" in Turkish. Another idea is that it has its roots in Old Turkic: Turmak (durmak, to stand, to rise, to remain steadfast), and Türemek (to sprout, to multiply, to propagate, to spread). It is sometimes said that "Turk" means the tent these people used when they had a nomadic life. It is also possibly from the Persian meaning "not dark". Other theories are that it means "a beautiful youth," "a barbarian," or "a robber." 
  • History. The first Turkic people probably lived between Central Asia and Siberia with the majority of them living in China. Turkic tribes, such as Khazars and Pechenegs, probably lived as nomads for many years before establishing the Göktürk Empire or Mongolia in the 6th century. The first mention of Turks was in a Chinese text that mentioned trade with Turk tribes along the Silk Road.
  • Turkic People of the Steppe. The steppes have been inhabited since the bronze age by organized societies whose history is not well known. These nomads did not leave physical traces (cities, forts, castles, temples, monuments, etc.) like the peoples who led a more sedentary life did. The history of the steppe tribes is very complex, turkic and mongol people united to form new tribes. The turkic tribes included the Tatars, Yakuts, Khazars, Uyghurs, Göktürks,  and Nogay, to name a few.
  • Tatar. The Tatars are found in every former republic of the former Soviet Union. Most of them live around the Volga region. Others inhabit Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Ukraine, and other Central Asian regions. Most of the Tatar are Hanafite Muslim. Many Tatar still honor pre-Islamic saints and holy places, celebrate the agricultural cycles, believe in supernatural powers (such as the "evil eye"), and sabantuy, or "rites of spring." These celebrations have their origins in Shamanism. This led to formation of a distinctive Muslim culture, in which the elements of Muslim orthodoxy mixed with religious tolerance formed a relatively liberal society.
  • The Turks in Bulgaria are descendants of Turkic settlers as well as Bulgarian converts to Islam who became Turkified during the centuries of Ottoman rule. It has also been suggested that some Turks living today in Bulgaria may be direct ethnic descendants of earlier medieval PechenegOğuz, and Cuman Turkic tribes. This community differs from the majority Bulgarian ethnicity and the rest of the Bulgarian nation by its own language, religion, culture, customs, and traditions.
 

 

 

STATISTICS FOR the TURKIC PEOPLE

 

 

POPULATION

 

 

 Uzbekistan

 

26,000,000 (92% of total country pop.)

 Russia

 

 

12,009,969 (8.41% of total country pop.)

 Kazakstan

 

12,000,000 (75% of total country pop.)

 Azerbaijan

 

9,047,000 (96.7% of total country pop.)

 Turkmenistan

 

4,500,000 (90% of the total country pop.)

 Kyrgyzstan

 

4,500,000 (90% of the total country pop.)

Tajikistan

 

1,200,000 (20% of the total country pop.)

 Bulgaria

 

600,000-800,000

 Ukraine

 

275,300

 Moldova

 

158,300

 Macedonia

 

 

77,959

Tatars In Russia: 5,375,000 
Tatar Population all Countries: 6,607,000

 

 

 

 

 TURKIC PEOPLES OF EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA

 

 

PeopleRegionLanguageReligion
Azerbaijanis

Azerbaijan Republic,

Iran,

Iraq,

Turkey,

Russia,

Georgia

 

Azerbaijani

Shia

Islam

Bashkirs

Russia, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan

 

Bashkir Sunni Islam
Chuvashes Russia Chuvash

Orthodox Christianity

 

Crimean Tatars

Ukraine (Crimea), Russia, Uzbekistan, Turkey,

Romania

 

Crimean Tatar Sunni Islam
Gagauzs

Moldova,

Greece

 

Gagauz Orthodox Christianity

Karachays 

and 

Balkars

 

Russia,

Turkey

Karachay-Balkar Sunni Islam
Karakalpaks

Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan

 

Karakalpak Sunni Islam
Kazakhs

Kazakhstan, Russia,

China, Uzbekistan

 

Kazakh Sunni Islam
Kumyks Russia Kumyk Sunni Islam
Kyrgyzs

Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, China,

Tajikistan

 

Kyrgyz Sunni Islam
Qashqai

Iran

 

Qashqai Shia Islam
Tatars

Russia, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Poland, Lithuania, Finland

 

Tatar Sunni Islam

Turkic Karaites 

and Krymchaks

 

Lithuania, Poland,
Russia,

Turkey

Karaim 

and Krymchak

Judaism
Turkish people

Turkey,

Germany,

Algeria,

Iraq,

Bulgaria,

Georgia,

Syria,

Yugoslavia, Greece

 

Turkish

Sunni Islam

and Alevism

Turkmens

Turkmenistan, Iran, Afghanistan

 

Turkmen Sunni Islam
Tuvans Russia Tuvan

Tibetan Buddhism

 

Uyghurs

China

(Xinjiang), Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkey

 

Uyghur Sunni Islam
Uzbeks

Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan

 

Uzbek Sunni Islam
Yakuts Russia Sakha Orthodox Christianity

 

 

 

 

 

 
ADOPTION FACTS ABOUT turkic children in eastern europe and central asia

 

  • Up until recently legal adoption of children has been a foreign concept to many Turkic cultures. Traditionally orphaned children were fostered, sent to the military, or given into servitude.
  • Many Turkic cultures feel that it is important that a Turkic child be raised in Turkic culture. Therefore many Turkic cultures encourage adoption by families with traditional Muslim values. 
  • Tatars do not usually allow their children with special needs to be raised by the state.
  • Many of the children in the "Social Homes" of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan are of Turkic heritage. Others are of Asian or Tungusic heritage (see Asian and Tungusic Siberian Cultures) 
  • Among the children who were adopted and brought to the USA from various regions of Russia, there are Tatar, Bashkir and Chuvash children. The children's homes in Mordovia, however, do not appear to have any children of Tartar heritage.

 

 

We strongly urge you to comply with the requirements established by the government and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process and/or provide you with more specific guidelines.  

 

If your agency is unable to help you with this, or no longer has an active program, the Joint Council on International Services suggests that families in this situation contact them for guidance.

 

In Fall 2006, the following advice was obtained by Karen's Adopiton Links for all families who needed to file their own Post Placement Reports:

  1. Use a Licensed Social Worker to do the Post Placement Report 
  2. Translate report with a Certified Translator. 
  3. Get the Post Placement Report apostilled.
  4. Include 5 pictures
  5. Suggested Sample form 
  6. Send directly by DHL or FedEx to the Minister of Education in the country or region of adoption. 

 

HELPFUL LINKS

 

Resources below are presented for information purposes only. Unless noted specifically as a FRUA INC group, FRUA INC does not endorse, nor have any connection with the following.

 

Adopted Children from Russia with ethnic Tatar, Bashkir or Chuvash Roots

Karen's Adoption Links

InterCountry Adoption Service Provider Search

Pre-Adoption Process & Paperwork

International Adoptive Medical Clinics & Physicians

PEAR (Parents for Ethical Adoption Reform) 

Turkic People (Wikipedia) 

The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire

Scott Polar Research Institute

Soviet Union: The Big Problems of Small Ethnic Groups

Turks of Bulgaria

Tartar

the Bashkir People

Chuvash People Group

Nganasans

Child Welfare Gateway

North American Council on Adoptable Children

 

 There are also other online parent support groups, lists and forums related to Inter-Country/Culture Adoption on Yahoo GroupsFacebook, the EEACAdoptive FamilesAdoption Services Support Groups, and Adoption.com

 

 

  

 

 

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